Shooting oneself in the foot at the DeKalb airport

We’ve been talking about fuel sales at DeKalb’s airport recently.

This was in the context of DeKalb’s new marketing practice of deeply discounting fuel in order to bring in new customers, and perhaps reaching at some point the same successful level of sales of 2013, the good old days when net sales more than covered the wages of the airport line service technicians.

DeKalb residents, who have been waiting for generations for the airport to pay its own freight, are interested in this subject. For one thing, word is getting out that the city redirected some $260,000 in local motor fuel taxes into the airport budget to help erase its invariable red ink. We’d rather that revenue go toward street maintenance.

People also are unsure that city government should plan for a loss of public money in a gamble. DeKalb is prepared to lose up to $20,000 a year. A loss leader gambit should remain in the realm of private business, the reasoning goes.

There’s a real head-scratcher among these developments as well. During the November 16 budget meeting, where department/division heads proposed cuts to their respective budgets, the list for the airport included cutting line service hours from 10 to 8 hours a day to reduce labor expenses by $19,000.

Got that? The airport is supposedly going “all out” to gain customers by discounting fuel to the point of enduring a $20,000 annual loss, but then proposes to cut the operational hours for providing that fuel.